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. This is why it is important to be aware of the plants in your home that are poisonous when you own a cat. While some cause minor side effects such as indigestion and vomiting, others can be fatal. Here is a list of six of the most highly toxic plants that cats should never eat. Keep tiger lilies out of your home and remove them from your garden so if you know you have local stray. Each part of the tiger lily is toxic to felines. It will cause kidney failure 24-72 hours after your cat ingests, leading to death. Your pet will have symptoms that include lethargy, vomiting, increased thirst, and lack of appetite after consuming part of it. Other lilies that are highly toxic to cats include Easter day, Asian and Japanese lilies. The smallest amount of lilies, into the pollen may be toxic. The autumn crocus is beautiful to look at, but toxic to cats. Bulbs are the most toxic part, but if your pet ingests any other party, he or she will have to danger. The symptoms include diarrhea after eating, vomiting, convulsions, kidney damage, liver damage, and heart arrhythmias. The autumn crocus causes intense burning in the mouth as well, so that your pet will definitely regret trying to eat. Oleander is popular with those who want to decorate their homes and gardens with natural beauty. However, if your pet seizes him and eat, it will cause a variety of horrible side effects. Oleander can even kill a cat consumes part of it. Ingestion will cause muscle tremors, heart abnormalities that can result in death, bloody diarrhea, vomiting, and poor coordination. The azalea is highly toxic to cats who are attracted to it and can start trying to eat the flowers and leaves. If your pet is eating just a small amount of this bush blooming, he or she will immediately experience irritation in the mouth. Other symptoms include vomiting and diarrhea. However, in severe cases, it will poison your pet, causing a sharp drop in blood pressure, followed by coma and death. Cyclamen is...

Apple Croton Apricot Sheet ( Pits of ) arrowgrass asparagus Autumn Crocus Avacado ( leaking and pit) Azalea Baby 's Breath Baneberry Bayonet Beargrass Beech Belladonna Bird of Paradise Bittersweet Black-eyed Susan Black Locust Bleeding Heart Bloodroot Bluebonnet Box Boxwood Branching Ivy Buckeyes Buddhist Pine Burning Bush Buttercup Cactus, Candelabra Caladium Calla Lily Castor Bean Ceriman Charm Dieffenbachia Cherry (pits, seeds and wilted leaves ) Cherry, most wild varieties Cherry, ground cherry, Laurel Chinaberry Chinese Christmas Evergreen Clematis Pink chrysanthemum cineria Cordatum Coriaria Cornflower Corn Cornstalk Plant Croton Corydalis Crocus, Autumn Crown of Thorns Cuban Laurel cutleaf Philodendron Cycads Cyclamen Daffodil Daphne Datura Deadly Nightshade Ivy Delphinium Decentrea Dieffenbachia Dracaena Dracaena Dumb Cane Palm Easter Lily * Eggplant Elaine Elderberry Elephant Ear Death Camas Devil Ivy Eucalyptus Euonymus Emerald Feather Evergreen Ferns Fiddle - vine leaves Florida Beauty lin Four O'Clock Digital Fruit Salad Plant Ivy Geranium German Giant Dumb Cane Glacier IvyGolden gold chain Dieffenbachia Gold Dust Dracaena gold Glow self Branching Ivy Heartland Philodendron Hellebore Hemlock Golden Pothos Gopher Purge Hahn, hemlock, henbane holly water the Honeysuckle horsebrush Horse Chestnuts Hurricane bean Indian Rubber Plant Hyacinth Indian tobacco plant Hydrangea Iris Iris Ivy Jack Janet Craig Dracaena in Japanese Show Lily Chair beans * Java Jessamine Jerusalem cherry Jimson Weed Jonquil Jungle Trumpets Kalanchoe Lacy Tree Philodendron Lantana Larkspur Laurel Lily Lily Lily Spider Marble Valley Locoweed Lupine Madagascar Dragon Tree Queen Marigold Marijuana Mescal Mexican Bean Breadfruit Miniature Croton Mistletoe Mock Orange Monkshood Moonseed Morning Glory Mother - in the language of law Mushrooms Morning Glory Mountain Laurel Narcissus Needlepoint Ivy Nephytis Nightshade Oleander Onion Oriental Lily * Peace Lily Peach ( pits and withered leaves...

ways a dog is poisoned from ingesting pesticides or cleaning products and eating or drinking something that is dangerous to their health. Read on for helpful tips on how you can keep your dog from eating something poisonous. House plants are beautiful and improve the air quality in your home; However, the specific plants can be dangerous to your dog's health. Remove all inside your house plants; this is the safest way to prevent your dog from chewing and eating the plant. The list of toxic plants is endless, so it is best to remove all of your environment. If this is not an option and the plants should stay inside, hang them high enough that your dog can not reach them, even if it jumps. Plants need to be completely out of reach so your dog does not find interesting or think they are toys to play with. While sharing your leftovers from dinner may seem like a good idea, make sure you do not feed your dog any foods that cause him harm. Focus mainly on the ingredients; if you use raisins in your favorite meatloaf, do not share it with your dog because the grapes are toxic to their system. Other food you should avoid giving your dog is chocolate, grapes, avocado, nuts, alcohol, onions, garlic, caffeine, salt and dairy products. Flea and tick medication is a common prescription that is given by a veterinarian. Make sure to always give the exact dosage amount within the recommended time on the prescription bottle. This assay is specific to your dog and will benefit the health of your dog. Keep a notebook with the time and date that you have administered the medicine to your dog is wise and will prevent overdose. Some pet owners are taking matters into their own hands and buy their flea and tick medication in local pet stores. Using counter products is risky but can work well at times. Consider weight, size and breed your dog to find the correct dosage appropriate for your furry friend legs. Tell your vet drug you have chosen for your dog is very important b...

. Sometimes toxicity occurs without the knowledge of the owner as a result of the dog getting into something he or she should not be consumed. Other times, the toxicity may be the result of pet owners simply are not aware of the dangers associated with certain substances and canine physiology. The following list contains elements that are known to be toxic to canines. It seems that dogs love this chocolate taste almost as much as humans do. Unfortunately, chocolate is toxic to dogs. Chocolate contains methylxanthines, which are compounds that perk cardiac effort, relax muscles and induce urination. For humans, methylxanthines are harmless, but a dog this compound can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and even death. The purity of chocolate has a significant impact on the damage it can do to a dog. For example, dark chocolate contains methylxanthines much white chocolate or milk. For a small dog like a Chihuahua or miniature poodle, dark chocolate half ounce enough to cause death. If a larger breed of dog were to consume the same amount, they would probably suffer from toxicity symptoms such as vomiting, but would have a better chance of survival. Four ounces of dark chocolate, or about half a cup of chocolate to cook, is fatal. With chocolate, grapes and raisins are other poisons hounds that often arise pet to the veterinary hospital, and in some cases the grave. The first grapes of toxicity in dogs are usually vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness. A more serious symptom of ingestion vine varies from mild to severe renal impairment. In some cases, it prevents the kidneys from the formation of the total dog urine. Studies have been conducted to determine what it is about grapes and raisins which leads to kidney problems, but the results have left unlighted scientists. It seems that some dogs are able to consume large quantities of grapes with few side effects, while others may have to consume a small amount of this food to be afflicted with severe renal problems. A...

WATERING: If grown in a container, allow the soil to become almost dry, then water thoroughly slowly adding water around the top of the soil.   If the plant is receiving morning or afternoon sun or temperatures are warm, Sagos may need to be watered at least weekly. Plants grown in low light or cool temperatures may need water every few weeks or so.  We generally water a plant twice.  The first time wets the soil, the second watering a few minutes later soaks the soil.  If planted in the landscape, water when dry, but do not keep continuously wet. Established plants can easily survive drought conditions.

INSECTS are limited to scale (can form a white or gray crust) or occasional attacks of mealy bugs. Use an insecticidal soap or a product labeled for scale. In all cases, use caution and follow the directions on the container.  Always water a plant before treatment or spraying during the coolest part of the day or morning. The combination of heat, direct sun, and insecticide can burn leaves. If your Sago seems to have an insect or fungus on the leaves, remove one or two and take them to your nearest Garden Center for identification and recommended treatment.

Regardless of age or size, Cycas revoluta is one of the easiest plants to grow, indoors or out, by beginner or expert. This subtropical adapts to a wide range of temperatures from 15 to 110 degrees F (-11 to 42 degrees C), accepts full sun or bright interior light, thrives with attention, and tolerates neglect. In addition, Cycads are extremely long-lived. A 220 year old specimen of Encephalartos, a relative of Cycas revoluta, is on display at the Royal Botanic Garden, Kew England; the restoration of the famous Palm House required it to be temporarily transplanted to a holding area for more than a year; the move was successful and is an example of the durability of these ancient "living fossils".

Offsets or "pups", growing at the base or along the sides of mature Sagos, are an excellent source of new plants. Remove them in early spring, late fall, or winter by using a hand trowel to pop small ones from the trunk side, or a sharp-shooter shovel to dig and gently crow-bar large ones from the base of the plant.  Remove all the pups' leaves and roots, then set them aside for the raw spot to dry for a week or so.  Plant in well-drained soil or a sandy mixture so that half the ball or trunk is below soil level - water thoroughly. Allow the soil to become nearly dry before watering. It's best to start new pups in a shady area or a bright indoor area.  Roots will slowly begin to form and the first leaves appear several months later. At that time, apply a mild dose of fertilizer and water when almost, but not completely dry. Allow the new plants to form a good root system before repotting into a larger container or planting in your garden or landscape. Warning! Removing pups can be very hard work on large Sagos with lots of babies.

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